Department of English
University of Pennsylvania
Fisher-Bennett Hall, room 127
3340 Walnut St.
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6273
Phone: (215) 898-7341
Fax: (215) 573-2063

English Department Events Calendar

 

Graduate Reading Groups

Kelly Writers House Events Calendar

The English Major: Information for students and faculty

Our Study Abroad Program at the University of London

In Abolitionist Geographies, Martha Schoolman contends that antislavery writers consistently refused standard geographical terms, instead expressing their dissenting views by appealing to other anachronistic, partial, or entirely fictional north–south and east–west axes. Schoolman reveals abolitionist literature’s explicit and intentional investment in geography as an idiom of political critique, by turns liberal and radical, practical and utopian.

More about the book:
http://www.upress.umn.edu/book-division/books/abolitionist-geographies

October 4-5, 2014

This coming Spring semester cartoonist Rob Berry and Professor Jean-Christophe Cloutier will be offering a new experimental course/workshop in both the analytical and practical sides of comic-making here at Penn. The language of comics (or graphic novels) is a fairly specialized, rarefied, and some might even say arcane discipline; for an art form that has flourished in popular culture alongside the growth of modernism and the development of cinema, it has remained largely untaught and understudied for the first hundred years of its thriving, challenging, and really rather unpretentious history. But comics have an exciting ability to render the dreams and fantasies of individual creators into stories celebrating personal vision; comics presents one of the cleanest, most direct routes for storytellers to put their narrative forward through the mesmerizing connection of words and images. As we move into a world of much more visually-based writing through media like television, cinema, gaming, and even online learning, it seems important for young writers and readers to take a good long look at the language of comics and its methodology. It is our belief that it will help to inform their work in these contemporary industries as well as nurture their potential for individual expression.

Beginning with the 24Hour Comic Jam here at Penn on October 4th-5th (see poster!) and leading right up through the course, we will continue to build this site; all the feedback we get will help inform us regarding what people might be looking for in not only the course we’ve designed, but also in the collaborative potential of comic-making. Please visit: http://makingcomicsatupenn.wordpress.com and email us at: makingcomicsatupenn@gmail.com

Wednesday, 12 November, 2014 • 5:00–6:30 pm
Rainey Auditorium,
Penn Museum, 3260 South Street

In the same years that black women writers were emerging as major innovators in American literature, black women singers like Syreeta Wright, Minnie Riperton, and Deniece Williams were forging new pathways in American music, rethinking traditional ideas about race and women's vocality. Farah Jasmine Griffin, whose latest book is Harlem Nocturne: Women Artists and Progressive Politics During World War II, will play some of the great recordings from the mid–1970s and discuss their cultural significance.

Cosponsored by Penn's Departments of English and Music.

See here for more information:
http://humanities.sas.upenn.edu/14-15/griffin.shtml

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Photo caption: Francis Daniel Pastorius, Beehive manuscript, 1696-1865, Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Pennsylvania.
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