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posted by on October 15, 2019
deadline: November 4, 2019

SASgov Travel Grant (Fall Application Window Now Open- Closes Nov 4, 2019.)

SASGov's Travel Grant is mainly designed to help defray the cost of travel for doctoral students presenting at academic conferences. This grant funds travel taking place between August 1 and December 31, 2019. 

 

Award Amount:

These amounts are not guaranteed and are awarded very selectively after being reviewed by the SASgov Finance Committee when the application period ends. Because funds are limited, we encourage graduate students to apply to multiple funding sources such as the ones listed on this page. Only enrolled doctoral students at the School of Arts and Sciences are eligible to apply.

posted by on September 13, 2019
deadline: January 13, 2020

Boren Graduate Fellowship

Boren Fellowships, an initiative of the National Security Education Program, provide funding for US graduate students to study less commonly taught languages in world regions critical to US interests.  Boren Fellowships provide funding for overseas language study, academic study, research, an academic internship, or a combination of the above (though all proposals must include a significant language component).  Boren Fellows commit to working in the federal government for at least one year after graduation.

http://www.borenawards.org/boren_fellowship/basics.html

Penn Deadline: January 13, 2020

 

Penn’s Application Process

  • Submit your application materials directly through the Boren Fellowship website by January 13, 2020.  CURF is then responsible for the final submission of your application. 

 

Contact Information

Lauren Orr
Center for Undergraduate Research and Fellowships 
The ARCH, 3601 Locust Walk 
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6224
lorr@upenn.edu
Please call 215-746-6488 to schedule an appointment

posted by on September 13, 2019
deadline: November 19, 2019

Critical Language Scholarship

The Critical Language Scholarship (CLS) Program is a fully funded summer overseas language and cultural immersion program for American undergraduate and graduate students. With the goal of broadening the base of Americans studying and mastering critical languages and building relationships between the people of the United States and other countries, CLS provides opportunities to a diverse range of students from across the United States at every level of language learning.

For more information, see their website, or for Penn-related questions, see Penn's local CLS website.

Deadline: November 19, 2019 (by 8:00pm EST)

 

Penn’s Application Process

 

  • While the Critical Language Scholarship does not require Penn’s nomination, CURF will be happy to provide advice, guidance, and application assistance to interested graduate students.  Undergraduate students are encouraged to contact Kristyn Palmiotto in Penn Abroad (krpalm@upenn.edu). 
posted by on September 5, 2019
deadline: October 8, 2019

Overview

The Fulbright U.S. Student Program provides grants for individually designed study/research projects or for English Teaching Assistant Programs.  A candidate will submit a Statement of Grant Purpose defining activities to take place during one academic year in a participating country outside the U.S.

During their grants, Fulbrighters will meet, work, live with and learn from the people of the host country, sharing daily experiences.  The program facilitates cultural exchange through direct interaction on an individual basis in the classroom, field, home, and in routine tasks, allowing the grantee to gain an appreciation of others’ viewpoints and beliefs, the way they do things, and the way they think. Through engagement in the community, the individual will interact with their hosts on a one-to-one basis in an atmosphere of openness, academic integrity, and intellectual freedom, thereby promoting mutual understanding.

Grant lengths and dates vary by country. Please consult the Fulbright website for details.

 

Open Study/Research Award

Applicants for study/research awards design their own projects and will typically work with advisers at foreign universities or other institutes of higher education. The study/research awards are available in approximately 140 countries. Program requirements vary by country, so the applicants' first step is to familiarize themselves with the program summary for the host country.

 

English Teaching Assistant Programs

The English Teaching Assistant (ETA) Programs place Fulbrighters in classrooms abroad to provide assistance to the local English teachers. ETAs help teach English language while serving as cultural ambassadors for the U.S. The age and academic level of the students varies by country, ranging from kindergarten to university level. Applicants for ETA Programs can apply to only one country. Visit the ETA landing page for specific country requirements and numbers of awards.

 

Fulbright-National Geographic Storytelling Fellowship

The Fulbright-National Geographic Storytelling Fellowship, a component of the Fulbright U.S. Student Program, provides opportunities for selected Fulbright US Student grantees to participate in an academic year of storytelling on a globally significant theme. This Fellowship is made possible through a partnership between the U.S. Department of State and the National Geographic Society. 

 

For the 2020-2021 competition, the Fulbright-National Geographic Storytelling Fellowship will accept proposals to undertake an in-depth examination of a globally relevant issue as an enhancement to their Fulbright research or arts project. Utilizing a variety of storytelling tools—including, but not limited to text, photography, video, audio/podcasts, public speaking, maps, and graphic illustrations - Storytellers have the opportunity to share their stories, and the stories of those they meet, through National Geographic and social media platforms. For more information, visit the Fulbright-NatGeo Storytelling Fellowship landing page.

posted by on September 5, 2019
deadline: November 5, 2019

Overview

The Mellon International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF) offers nine to twelve months of support to graduate students in the humanities and humanistic social sciences who are enrolled in PhD programs in the United States and conducting dissertation research on non-US topics. Seventy fellowships are awarded annually. Fellowship amounts vary depending on the research plan, with a per-fellowship average of $23,000. The fellowship includes participation in an SSRC-funded interdisciplinary workshop upon the completion of IDRF-funded research.

Eligibility

The program is open to graduate students in the humanities and humanistic social sciences—regardless of citizenship—enrolled in PhD programs in the United States. Applicants to the 2020 IDRF competition must complete all PhD requirements except on-site research by the time the fellowship begins or by December 2020, whichever comes first.

The program invites proposals for dissertation research conducted, in whole or in part, outside the United States, on non-US topics. It will consider applications for dissertation research grounded in a single site, informed by broader cross-regional and interdisciplinary perspectives, as well as applications for multi-sited, comparative, and transregional research. Proposals that identify the United States as a case for comparative inquiry are welcome; however, proposals that focus predominantly or exclusively on the United States are not eligible. 

Applicants from select disciplines within the humanities (Art History, Architectural History, Classics, Drama/Theater, Film Studies, Literature, Musicology, Performance Studies, Philosophy, Political Theory, and Religion) may request three or more months of funding for international on-site dissertation research in combination with site-specific research in the United States, for a total of nine to twelve months of funding. All other applicants (for instance, those in Anthropology, Geography, History, Political Science, and Sociology, among others) must request nine to twelve months of on-site, site-specific dissertation research with a minimum of six months of research outside of the United States. Research within the United States must be site-specific (e.g., at a particular archive) and cannot be at the applicant’s home institution unless that institution has necessary site-specific research holdings. Please note that the IDRF program supports research only and may not be used for dissertation write-up.

Applicants who have completed significant funded dissertation research in one country by the start of their proposed IDRF research may be ineligible to apply to the IDRF to extend research time in the same country. Eligibility will be at the discretion of the IDRF program, depending on completed research time and funding. The IDRF program expects fellows to remain at their research site(s) for the full nine- to twelve-month funding period. The IDRF program will not support study at foreign universities, conference participation, or dissertation write-up. The program does not accept applications from PhD programs in law, business, medicine, nursing, or journalism, nor does it accept applications in doctoral programs that do not lead to a PhD.

For more information, visit the Social Science Research Council's landing page for the fellowship.

posted by on January 29, 2019
deadline: February 1, 2019

See link for area studies specific deadlines at Penn

 

About FLAS Fellowships

The Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships program provides allocations of academic year and summer fellowships to institutions of higher education or consortia of institutions of higher education to assist meritorious undergraduate students and graduate students undergoing training in modern foreign languages and related area or international studies or with the international aspects of professional or fields of study.

The goals of the fellowship program are:  

  • To assist in the development of knowledge, resources, and trained personnel for modern foreign language and area or international studies.
  • To foster foreign language acquisition and fluency.
  • To develop a domestic pool of international experts to meet national needs.

FLAS fellowships are funded by the U.S. Department of Education and administered by the University of Pennsylvania’s Title VI National Resource Centers to assist students in acquiring foreign language and either area or international studies competencies, including the international aspects of professional or other fields of study. FLAS awards are available only for specific languages, and are contingent on federal funding. Please direct any questions to the FLAS Coordinator of your chosen language.    

Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents of the United States. Applications by students in professional fields are encouraged. Preference will be given to applicants with a high level of academic ability and with previous language training.  Academic Year and Summer FLAS awards are two separate competitions requiring two complete and separate applications.   

Students receiving Academic Year Fellowships must be enrolled in full-time study for the duration of the FLAS award and must take one language course and one related area or international studies course each semester. Academic Year Fellows must be admitted to or enrolled in undergraduate, graduate, or professional programs at the University of Pennsylvania. FLAS awards may be used in some cases for students participating in official overseas language programs and in very limited cases for dissertators. Please see the FLAS FAQ page or contact the relevant FLAS Coordinator.   

Summer Fellowships are for intensive language programs either domestically or abroad and require a separate application from the Academic Year Fellowship (minimum contact hours and duration of summer courses are outlined in the FLAS FAQ section).     

posted by on January 29, 2019
deadline: February 28, 2019

In 2019, James Joo-Jin Kim Program in Korean Studies will award up to three (3) grants, each in an amount up to $3,000, to assist Penn graduate students in their research on Korea. Any student enrolled in a graduate degree program at Penn is eligible to apply. 

Kim Program Graduate Research Grant Application 2019

A completed application form and a faculty recommendation letter must be e-mailed to Michelle Silverio <msilveri@sas.upenn.edu> by 3:00 pm, Thursday, February 28, 2019. Award notifications will be e-mailed by mid-March.

Link

posted by on January 29, 2019
deadline: March 4, 2019

Robert L. Platzman Memorial Fellowships - Summer 2019

 

Link here

The University of Chicago Library invites applications for short-term research fellowships for the summer of 2019.

Any visiting researcher, writer, or artist residing more than 100 miles from Chicago, and whose project requires on-site consultation of University of Chicago Library collections, primarily archives, manuscripts, rare books, or other materials in the Special Collections Research Center, is eligible.

The Special Collections Research Center is the principal repository of rare books, manuscripts, and archives in the University of Chicago Library.

 

The Rare Book Collection includes titles from the fifteenth century to the present. Areas of strength in the Rare Book Collection include works and editions of Homerclassical literature and antiquities, the history of science and medicine, English and American literature, history, and economics, nineteenth-century English poetrymodern English and American poetry, historical children's books, Jewish life and culture, theology, Renaissance humanism, and the printed works of Frederick Chopin.

Early manuscripts include texts from the ancient, medieval, Renaissance, and early modern periods. Holdings include the Goodspeed Manuscript Collection of early Byzantine Gospels and liturgical texts; late medieval and Renaissance secular and religious texts, including books of hours and works of Boccaccio and Chaucer; court and manorial documents of the Bacon family; and legal documents from northern Italy in the Rosenthal collection.

Modern manuscripts include collections on the early history of Kentucky and the Ohio River valleyAbraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, and the Civil War era; civil rights leader Ida B. Wells; Poetry magazine and modern poetry; post-World War II atomic scientists political organizations, Cold War intellectual politics, and world constitutionalism; Native American education and community organization; modern commercial printing; Chicago labor and social reform; Chicago medical history; the Hyde Park-Kenwood neighborhood of Chicago; and the Chicago Jazz Archive.

The University Archives documents the history of the University of Chicago, the work of its faculty, and the life of the academic community. Among areas of particular strength are the history of higher education, including race and gender on campus; the development of academic disciplines and area studies; and records and papers in economicssociology, history, anthropology and ethnology, education, law, social thought, social work, theology and history of religionsecology, physics, astrophysics, and geophysical science, among other fields.

 

Fellowship Applications

Support for beginning scholars is a priority of the program. Applications from underrepresented groups are encouraged. Applications in the fields of late nineteenth- or early twentieth-century physics or physical chemistry, or nineteenth-century classical opera, will receive special consideration.

Awards will be made based on the applicant's ability to complete the proposed on-site research successfully within the timeframe of the fellowship. Applicants should explain why the project cannot be conducted without on-site access to the original materials and the extent to which University of Chicago Library collections are central to the research. Up to $3,000 of support will be awarded to help cover estimated travel, living, and research expenses.

Successful applicants who are not US citizens must hold a J1 visa and meet other requirements for J1 visa status: https://internationalaffairs.uchicago.edu/page/important-information-j-1-scholars

The deadline for applications is March 4, 2019. Notice of awards will be made by March 29, 2019, for use between June 10, 2019, and September 27, 2019.

Applicants must provide the following information:

  • A cover letter (not to exceed one page) including the project title; a brief summary; estimated dates of on-site research; and a budget for travel, living, and research expenses during the period of on-site research
  • A research proposal not to exceed three double-spaced pages. Applicants should include references to specific archival finding aids and catalog records of particular relevance to their proposed project whenever possible.
  • A curriculum vitae of no longer than two pages
  • Two letters of support from academic or other scholars. References may be sent with the application or separately.

Submit application in one electronic file to: scrcfellowship@lib.uchicago.edu

Letters of reference in electronic form are preferred; print letters of reference can be sent to:

Robert L. Platzman Memorial Fellowships
Special Collections Research Center
The University of Chicago Library
1100 E. 57th Street
Chicago, IL 60637

For additional information contact:
Daniel Meyer, Director, Special Collections Research Center.

posted by on January 21, 2019
deadline: March 1, 2019

Applications are being accepted for the 2019 Eudora Welty Research Fellowship. Established by the Eudora Welty Foundation and the Mississippi Department of Archives and History, the $2,000 fellowship will be awarded to a graduate student for research using the department’s Eudora Welty Collection. The fellowship seeks to nurture scholars at the beginning of their academic careers, in order to increase their lifelong interest in, and promote continued academic and public appreciation of, Eudora Welty’s life and works.

The stipend may be used for travel, housing, and other expenses during the Welty fellow’s two-week minimum stay in Jackson Mississippi. To receive more information and an application click here. The deadline to apply is March 1, 2019.

The Eudora Welty Collection at the Mississippi Department of Archives and History is the premier collection of Eudora Welty materials in the world and one of the most varied literary collections in the United States. The collection includes manuscripts, letters, photographs, drawings, essays, and film and video footage that spans Welty’s entire life. Beginning in 1957, and over the course of more than forty years, Welty donated materials to the department, primarily literary manuscripts and photographs. At her death the remainder of her papers were bequeathed to MDAH and included unpublished manuscripts and 14,000 items of correspondence with family, friends, scholars, young writers, and noted writers. The collection may be accessed at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building, 200 North Street, Jackson.

For colleges and universities interested in sharing the fellowship opportunity, a flier is available here. For more information on the collection or the fellowship, contact Forrest Galey at 601-576-6850, or by email at fgaley@mdah.ms.gov.