Cary M. Mazer

Cary M. Mazer is Associate Professor of Theatre Arts and English at the University of Pennsylvania; he is active in the Theatre Arts Program, the University's interdepartmental undergraduate major in Theatre, which he chaired for many years. For a story (in the University of Pennsylvania Almanac) about his having received the 2001 School of Arts and Sciences teaching award for Mentorship of Undergraduate Research, click here.

He is author of Shakespeare Refashioned: Elizabethan Plays on Edwardian Stages (UMI Research Press, 1981), editor of Great Shakespeareans XV: Poel, Granville Barkeer, Guthrie, Wanamaker (Bloomsbury-Arden, 2013), and author of Double Shakespeares: Emotional-Realist Acting and Contemporary Performance (Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 2015).

To see a c.v., click here.

Click here for Janet Falon's home page.

At Penn, Mazer teaches courses in various periods of Theatre History and Dramatic Literature. In the fall semester he is teaching, Theatre Arts 236: Acting Shakespeare, and Theatre Arts 275: Shakespeare Performance History. For syllabi from past courses, click here.

Among the theatre productions he has directed are:

and, for the Theatre Arts Program at Penn:

And semi-staged script-in-hand readings: He has written two plays: In addition, he has acted (as Kadmos) in the Theatre Arts Program production of The Bacchae by Euripides, directed by Jim Schlatter (1992); and served as guest dramaturg for productions of The Importance of Being Earnest, by Oscar Wilde (1993), Misalliance, by G. Bernard Shaw (1994), Heartbreak House, by Shaw (1998), and The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare (2002), at People's Light & Theatre Company of Malvern, PA. He has also provided scholarly material and written program notes for the Shakespeare Theatre of Washington's production of Shakespeare's Richard II (2000) and Shaw's Major Barbara (2008).

From 1986 to 1999, he was a theatre critic for the Philadelphia City Paper. To read reviews from past issues of the City Paper, click here. Click here to read his valedictory essay in City Paper, September 16, 1999).

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